Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer 

In response to the impending arrival of Emerald Ash Borer (EAB), the City of Blaine developed a comprehensive EAB management plan in 2009. That plan included proactive removal of ash trees.  In 2010, the city secured a $70,000 state grant that included a city match of $40,000. That year the management strategy involved removing boulevard and park trees that were unhealthy or otherwise undesirable. Boulevard trees are within the city right-of-way which is typically 15 feet from the curb. The replacement trees are free and installed by the city. The city has continued proactive removal of ash trees every year since 2010.

In the years that followed Emerald Ash Borer spread to all areas of the city and at this time the city is no longer replacing infected boulevard trees due to the high number of ash trees in the city.

The city does remove dead and diseased ash trees with a focus on trees that are causing a safety hazard. When the trees are removed the stumps remain. The stumps will eventually be removed, but the city will wait until there are at least 200-300 stumps to remove. By waiting the city will be able to remove the stumps at a lower cost than if the stumps were removed a few at a time.

In 2020 the City of Blaine received a grant to plant about 200 trees in the city. This grant is designed to help combat the loss of trees due to Emerald Ash Borer. This grant will help improve the urban forest in neighborhood city parks.

This state grant was awarded by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The funding comes from the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund. The grant funding of $28,364 will be matched by city funding at the same amount.

Blaine has been hit especially hard by Emerald Ash Borer due to the large number of ash trees in the city. The trees paid for through this grant will be planted in 2020 and 2021.

Recommended Treatments

The best way to protect your ash tree is to have a professional inject your tree. Tree injections are highly effective and can protect your tree for up to three years. You will need to re-inject the tree to keep it protected after three years.

Not Recommended

There are chemicals available that you mix with water and pour around the root system of the tree. This method is not recommended. This method is not very effective, and could potentially leach into the groundwater. 

If you suspect your tree has EAB or have additional questions, please contact City Forester Marc Shippee.